School Shootings and How They Affect Us

OXFORD, MICHIGAN - DECEMBER 03: A memorial outside of Oxford High School continues to grow on December 03 2021 in Oxford, Michigan.  Four students were killed and seven others injured on November 30, when student Ethan Crumbley allegedly opened fire with a pistol at the school. Crumbley has been charged in the shooting. One or both of his parents are expected to be charged today.   (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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OXFORD, MICHIGAN – DECEMBER 03: A memorial outside of Oxford High School continues to grow on December 03 2021 in Oxford, Michigan. Four students were killed and seven others injured on November 30, when student Ethan Crumbley allegedly opened fire with a pistol at the school. Crumbley has been charged in the shooting. One or both of his parents are expected to be charged today. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Shyrell Maitra, Editor

For years, students have seen school shootings as something that we cannot control. It’s become normal to have lockdowns, lectures, and even make jokes about shootings. As a senior, I’ve known about school shootings since elementary school. The first incident I heard of was the Sandy Hook shooting in 2012. I remember thinking it was a once in a lifetime news story that I would never hear of again. As the years went by, I realized these shootings were extremely common and people seemed to only be able to send thoughts and prayers. 

 

As students, we come to school expecting to learn and see friends. School isn’t supposed to be a place we fear, but a place we feel safe from things outside the building. When thinking of shootings, it’s hard to dismiss them and pretend they could never happen at our school because our society finds it easy to ignore warning signs of students. As well as this, our country has very loose gun laws that allow teenagers to come into possession of firearms. There’s many things we need to address before even thinking of these acts of violence ending. 

 

One very important issue we need to look into is gun laws. School doesn’t teach us everything, but one thing we should all take advantage of is our civics classes and social studies classes where we can learn about our government and how we can ask our government officials for change. Although many students can’t vote while in high school, it’s important to be informed on political issues regarding the government as well as the effects new bills and regulations affect our everyday lives. Everyone has a voice and has the ability to make change. If we work together to bring our diverse ideas together, we can make a change to feel safer at school as well as in the outside world. 

 

Along with this, it’s important for schools as well as students to speak up and act quickly when a student shows signs of violence or depression. We are constantly told that our school and peers care about us, but how can we truly believe that when we keep seeing schools far and near experience these life changing events? We see each other everyday, in the hallways, lunch, class, etc. We see things our teachers don’t, and not speaking up when noticing troubling things is a huge reason why so many of these school shooters can get to the point they do. I realize it might seem tedious or even none of our business to report students or their actions but in order to keep a safe environment at a school or workplace, you need to work together to communicate anything you might see wrong. 

 

It’s hard to talk about these things, especially for high schoolers. I know it might seem like it’s silly or might never happen, but we need to realize that these sorts of things are extremely possible, but also, very avoidable. I hope that in the future, we can do better to not only help create stricter gun laws, but also just look out for each other and make sure another tragedy never happens again.